Janko Stojanow

ON THE ABSOLUTE RATIONAL WILL

(SUBLATION OF ’S PHILOSOPHY) G.W.F. Hegel

  Volume 2 

Further development of the Philosophy of Absolute Rational Will

 

 

IX. Applied Philosophy  

(Making Philosophy a totally practical Science)

 

 

 

The science of philosophy has always needed - but seldom had, - philosophers having the will to make it an integral part of actual life. The supreme aim of the Philosophy of Absolute Rational Will is to overcome and succeed in making philosophy a totally universal science having absolutely practical applications in everyday life like all other Natural sciences. During Hegel's lifetime the task of philosophy was to change its status of being just "love of wisdom" and become a genuine science. Having inherited the wealth of ancient Greek philosophy as well as German classical idealism, Hegel made philosophy a science. The task of our time is to develop explicitly its practicability - what has been so far only in-itself is now to be presented in the magnificence of its blossoming. Having in itself the highest necessity of the Absolute, philosophy wills to bring back into use its unity with the Natural Sciences, which it enjoyed in ancient Greece. The philosophy of Absolute Rational Will has the need to become a universal practical science concerned with the application of knowledge to useful ends rather than with theory and pure speculation only; it aims at practical - usable as well as workable, - applications. It is a manifestation of the Will to put itself into practice so as to deal realistically and sensibly with practical life and professional work. 

We can clearly divide philosophy into Realistic and Speculative (intellectualistic) philosophy. The first includes the great achievements of materialism, to which belong the atomists - the first materialists, Aristotle's encyclopedia of sciences - according to him the soul and the body are essentially related. The soul is not a separate substance, but an arrangement of stuff, or material substance, of which the body is made. Furthermore, we have to mention the French and British materialists and all Natural Sciences - it wasn't without a good reason that the British considered Newton to be a philosopher and called physics Natural Philosophy. And last but not least, Feuerbach, Marx and Engels definitely made great contributions to realistic philosophy.

As for speculative philosophy, it suffered a substantial defeat even during Hegel's lifetime, which must have been so depressive and dispiriting that in the Introduction of his Philosophy of Nature Hegel states: "... now it is not acknowledged, as it used to be, that studying philosophy has to be a necessary introduction and foundation of every further scientific education and professional work." Hegel must have profoundly regretted the fact that even in his epoch philosophy was no longer organically woven into the spiritual culture of his time. It ceased to have whatever practical significance. According to the absolutely authoritative account of Hegel himself: “With the Fichtian philosophy a revolution took place in Germany. The public had penetrated as far as the philosophy of Kant, and until the Kantian philosophy was reached the interest awakened by Philosophy was general; it was accessible, and men were curious to know about it, it pertained to the ordinary knowledge of a man of culture. Formerly men of business, statesmen, occupied themselves with Philosophy; now, however, with the intricate idealism of the philosophy of Kant, their wings droop helpless to the ground. Hence it is with Kant that we first begin to find a line of separation which parts us from the common mode of consciousness; ... With Fichte the common consciousness has still further separated itself from the speculative element therein present. ... In this way since Fichte's time few men have occupied themselves with speculation. ... Even less than Fichte did Schelling attain to popularity, for the concrete in its nature is directly speculative.” (Hegel, Lectures on the history of philosophy, translated by E. S. Haldane and Frances H. Simson, volume 3, Medieval and modern philosophy, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London, 1995, pages 504-505, page 521) The same holds true still more in respect of Hegel as well, because he achieved substantially more than them and he tried to make philosophy a science. 

Nonetheless, Philosophy has never been a practicable science sensu stricto. The very fact that we talk about Plato's philosophy. Aristotle's philosophy, etc. - i.e. introducing the principle of private property in Philosophy, - speaks volumes how underdeveloped  philosophy is; it is still at pri-scientific level. One of the main reasons for that despicable state of affairs could be the connection and indivisability of religion (theology) and philosophy since times immemorial. No wonder that at the time philosophy has been strongly influenced by theology. In science proper, we do not only speculate - science is based on experiment and empirical thinking. 

Hegel's philosophy, however, is still only a pure cognitive, intellectual, speculative philosophy. Claiming that Spirit is the self-knowing actual  Idea, Hegel fails to take into consideration that although thinking is an immanent moment of the Absolute, it is not the totality of the Absolute itself. In fact, his Concept is the logical expression of the absolutely actual material volition - the absolute actual material mover; he is forced to call the absolute actual  material volition a concept in itself. But Hegel does not speak so. He uses the language of his Logic only - determination, self-determination, absolute negativity, the negation of negation - everywhere in Hegel's works we come across the categories of his Logic presented as categories of the absolute. The language of Natural Sciences and the philosophy of Absolute Rational Will, however, is closer to the point of view of the public in large. It is much more natural to say that the Absolute self-organises itself instead of using the language of Hegel's Logic and saying that it self-determines itself.  

 

Kant was absolutely right to supply a criticism of our faculties of knowledge in his critical philosophy. He claimed that "before obtaining knowledge we must inquire into the facilities of knowledge... that we must know the faculty of knowledge before we can know." (Hegel, Lectures on the History of Philosophy, volume 3, Medieval and modern philosophy, translated by E. S. Haldane and Frances H. Simson, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London, 1995, page 428) Hegel mocks and ridicules Kant (numerous times in his works) saying: "but how we are to know without knowing, how we are to apprehend the truth before the truth, it is impossible to say. It is the old story of the scholasticos who would not go into the water till he could swim. Thus since the investigation of the faculties of knowledge is itself knowing, it cannot in Kant attain to what it aims at because it is that already - it cannot come to itself because it is already with itself." (Ibid. page 428-429) Yet the point Kant makes is of great importance; it deserves to be examined meticulously. He doubts the right of pure speculative philosophy to claim its superiority over the Natural Sciences. He is absolutely right to demand that on their way to truth men must know the nature and the function of their instrument.   

 

Brain is this instrument and it deserves to be examined more than anything whatsoever in philosophy. The crux of the matter is that Philosophy of Mind, our searching for the mind cannot make a great headway without this close examination of brain for it is the most complex organ in known universe. Due to this examination we will learn that brain is the highest organisation of the Absolute Rational Will. It is the brain that processes the latter; for this reason, everything we do comes from our brains. The brain's practical activities are a manifestation of the principle of Absolute Material Entelechy "Will yourself." The practical (the brain's practical activities) is infinitely more important than the theoretical (its theoretical  activities) and has the latter in itself as inherently sublated. The philosophy of Absolute Rational Will knows that the theoretical, the Spirit is subordinated to the practical and a means for its self-achieving; it is to be put into practice. 

 

A long time ago scientists began discovering what we know about brain today and many brain discoveries have been made so far. Infinitely more is to come in brain science and infinitely more  brain discoveries are to be made in the future, and - Kant is unconditionally right, - the point is that no speculative philosophy can make them.

Today our task is to free philosophy of the its pure speculative (intellectualistic) form and make the latter a part of the philosophy of Mankind. Hegel is absolutely right that the Pythagorean philosophy made the transition from realistic to intellectual philosophy but now it is high time we made philosophy a realistic science once again. In line with the method of his speculative thinking, Hegel derives everything in the World from the Notion (the Concept). However, pure Hegelian type speculation cannot be stronger and more powerful than Aristotelian thinking empiricism as well as the method of the Natural Sciences. As far as in the fourth century B.C. philosophy included the whole of science and Aristotle understood, integrated and systemized it. It wasn't by accident that the British and the French scientists before Hegel used to call physics and all empirical sciences Philosophy. Philosophy has to be practically verifiable; it has to be able to incorporate the whole wealth of the Natural Sciences if we want to elevate the rang and importance of philosophy in the culture of modern civilization. Hegel is right to say that the spiritual concrete is poor from sensuality: "We have to discern the natural concrete from the concrete of thought, which is poor with sensuality." (Hegel, Lectures on the History of Philosophy, translated by E. S. Haldane, in three volumes, Volume 1, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London, 1995, page 149) Nonetheless, what the natural concrete is rich with is material entelechiality - the Absolute, God, as it is in-and-for-itself. 

Aristotle and Hegel's philosophical methods deserve to be meticulously examined and compared. Whereas Aristotle represents  excellent pragmatic thinking empiricism, which has been widely used with tremendous success by all Natural Sciences for millennia, Hegel prefers pure speculative thinking. True, Hegel is right to say that the spiritual concrete is poor from sensuality: "We have to discern the natural concrete from the concrete of thought, which is poor with sensuality." (Hegel, Lectures on the History of Philosophy, translated by E. S. Haldane, in three volumes, Volume 1, University of Nebraska Press, Lincoln and London, 1995, page 149) Nevertheless, what the natural concrete is rich with is material entelechiality - the Absolute, God, as it is in-and-for-itself. In line with the method of his speculative thinking, Hegel derives everything in the World from the Notion (the Concept).

 

 

To be continued.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PHILOSOPHY OF THE ABSOLUTE RATIONAL WILL

(SUBLATION OF ’S PHILOSOPHY) G.W.F. Hegel 

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